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Pregnancy and Teeth – What You Should Really Know

Posted on September 8, 2017 in Uncategorized

While for most of us, oral health is limited to daily brushing and flossing and visiting the dentist every six months, there are some people with special health considerations that have an influence on their oral and dental health. There can be no doubt that lifestyle and genetics play a big part in determining whether or not you have strong, white and attractive teeth. However, should you contract a disease like diabetes, or should you fall pregnant, your oral health may be affected quite severely.

It is important to remember that your oral health is a reflection of your state of health in general. HIV/AIDS, excessive stress, smoking, cancer, diabetes, and even certain kinds of medicines may have an effect on your teeth. For this reason, you need to ensure that you are living a healthy lifestyle and that your doctor and dentist are always fully informed about changes in your state of health. In particular, should find yourself the victim of a serious condition; consult your dentist as soon as possible, to find out whether there are any considerations to take into account for the benefit of your oral health. Pregnancy can affect the state of your teeth quite substantially, so visit your dentist regularly.

Pregnancy causes a wide variety of changes in every woman’s body, and these often have a considerable effect on her mouth and teeth. There is an old wives’ tale that one loses a tooth with each pregnancy, and while women will certainly notice a difference in their oral health during and after their pregnancy, there are a number of steps they can take to minimize the risk and ensure their teeth stay as healthy as possible. The first factor influencing oral health is the change in a woman’s hormonal profile, which not only gives rise to the mood changes associated with pregnant women, but also leads to inflamed gums.

This inflammation causes the gums to swell, which makes cleaning teeth, and the important junction between the crowns and gums, more difficult. As a result, many women end up with pregnancy gingivitis, gum disease caused by pregnancy. Gingivitis tends to occur more often during the second trimester of pregnancy. This is because estrogens levels rise, increasing blood flow to all the body’s tissues. As a result, when cleaning their teeth, pregnancy women often notice that gums start to bleed. This is not a sign that the gums have been injured. Rather, it is an indication that extra care must be taken to ensure that brushing and flossing are as efficient as possible.